What is always triggered by an infection, claims more lives than any cancer and is seen more often than heart attacks? Sepsis. Also known as blood poisoning, sepsis is a global health care problem and carries a high risk of death.

Inflammatory processes drive the progression of sepsis; therefore, it is vital to understand how inflammation is initiated in the immune response.

Kavita Bisht, a PhD student from Griffith University, was placed through the APR.Intern program into the Critical Care Research Group (CCRG) at The Prince Charles Hospital to investigate how our immune system responds to this infection.

“My project in the CCRG used sheep models to identify the best resuscitation therapies to help reduce sepsis-induced deaths. I wanted to see how immune cells change when the blood is poisoned and if different revival treatments affect the inflammatory response of cells differently,”

 

Kavita Bisht, PhD Intern at The Prince Charles Hospital

Kavita’s academic mentor, Dr Andrew Bulmer from the Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, was quick to see the benefits brought by the program.

“This internship strengthened collaboration with Griffith University, leading to several shared publication outputs. I honestly believe the APR.Intern program is of incredible value,”

 

Dr Andrew Bulmer, Academic Mentor from Griffith University’s Menzies Health Institute Queensland

PRINCE CHARLES HOSPITAL AND GRIFFITH UNIVERSITY COLLABORATE TO UNLOCK IMMUNE SYSTEM SECRETS